Nutcote Cottage, the former studio home of children’s author May Gibbs, is the first NSW location to receive a blue plaque.

By ANNA USHER

Lower north shore locations and identities with stories to celebrate have a chance to become recognised with the universally known heritage symbol – a blue plaque.

But if you’d like to nominate a local landmark, you’ll need to be quick.

Communities across NSW have until October 31 to suggest places and people of significance as part of the NSW Blue Plaques Program, a $5 million project aimed at capturing public interest and fascination in key personalities, events and places that are important to the stories of NSW.

“Blue Plaques are an internationally recognised way of promoting the heritage significance of our key heritage places, people and stories,” NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet said.

“This wonderful new program, modelled on the well-known English Heritage plaques program, will help unlock the stories of our heritage, key places and notable people for residents of NSW and visitors alike.”

The Blue Plaque to commemorate Australian author and illustrator May Gibbs.

Nutcote Cottage, the Neutral Bay home in which children’s author May Gibbs created the bush fairytales of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie, is the first building in NSW to receive a blue plaque.

Sir Edward Hallstrom, inventor, businessman, and former President of the Taronga Park Trust has also been honoured, with his plaque set to adorn the zoo next month.

Minister Don Harwin MLC said the scheme will be delivered through Heritage NSW.

“Heritage is about recognising and celebrating our progress as a State and a nation. These sites and stories engender a shared sense of belonging, of identity, and connection.”

“In a post-COVID world, focusing on our local communities and local environment has never been more important.

“Programs that celebrate local stories will add another opportunity for people to explore their local neighbourhoods, centres and towns, and to connect and participate with our State’s heritage,” Mr Harwin said.

Sir Edward Hallstrom (1886-1970) will be honoured with a blue plaque at Taronga Zoo.

Plaques have also been confirmed at the former Registrar-General’s Building in Sydney, which was designed by architect Walter Liberty Vernon, and the heritage-listed Caroline Chisholm Cottage in East Maitland, which was a Hunter Valley hostel for homeless migrants run by women’s advocate Caroline Chisholm.

The blue plaque program originated in London in 1866, with more than 950 plaques now on buildings across the city. To be awarded an official English Heritage plaque, the proposed recipient must have died at least 20 years previously.

Heritage NSW is looking for local stories that are interesting, fun and quirky, along with more sombre stories that should not be forgotten as part of our history. This could relate to, for example:

  • Aboriginal people, heritage, culture
  • Early European settlement
  • Migrant heritage
  • Social movements and change
  • Wartime history
  • Industrial advancements
  • Arts and culture
  • Sport
  • Lower north shore historic events.
  • Local heroes.

Residents on the lower north shore should submit their nominations before October 31.

Plaques have also been confirmed at the former Registrar-General’s Building in Sydney, which was designed by architect Walter Liberty Vernon, and the heritage-listed Caroline Chisholm Cottage in East Maitland, which was a Hunter Valley hostel for homeless migrants run by women’s advocate Caroline Chisholm.

The blue plaque program originated in London in 1866, with more than 950 plaques now on buildings across the city. To be awarded an official English Heritage plaque, the proposed recipient must have died at least 20 years previously.

Heritage NSW is looking for local stories that are interesting, fun and quirky, along with more sombre stories that should not be forgotten as part of our history. This could relate to, for example:

  • Aboriginal people, heritage, culture
  • Early European settlement
  • Migrant heritage
  • Social movements and change
  • Wartime history
  • Industrial advancements
  • Arts and culture
  • Sport
  • Lower north shore historic events.
  • Local heroes.

For more information, head here and nominate before October 31.

NOMINATE HERE